Bringing the quantum nanoscience community together


There are many conferences that cover subfields of this research area but as far as the organizers know, there is currently no conference that attempts to bring this broader community under one roof. We hope to bring together experts and young scientists from all around the globe in this exciting research topic.

The Center for Quantum Nanoscience has strong expertise in investigating, assembling and controlling quantum systems at surfaces – a relatively new topic in quantum nanoscience. Therefore, we feel that this location might be a good seed to create a long-lasting international conference on quantum nanoscience.
 
3-Days Conference
25 - 27 September 2019

Ewha Womans University
Center for Quantum Nanoscience
in Seoul, South Korea

16 invited speakers
from Europe, US, Asia and Australia

8 Coutries
South Korea, China, Germany, Switzerland, Italy, UK, USA and Australia
 
 

International Organizing Committee:


Prof. Andreas Heinrich, IBS Center for Quantum Nanoscience, Seoul, Korea (chair)
Prof. Daniel Loss, University of Basel, Switzerland
Prof. Ania Jayich, University of California at Santa Barbara, USA
Prof. Andrea Morello, University of New South Wales, Australia
Prof. Lieven Vandersypen, Delft University, The Netherlands
Prof. Roberta Sessoli, University of Florence, Italy

Domestic Organizing Committee:


Prof. Andreas Heinrich, Center for Quantum Nanoscience, Seoul, Korea
Michelle Randall, Center for Quantum Nanoscience, Seoul, Korea (chair)
Jihee Min, Center for Quantum Nanoscience, Seoul, Korea
Prof. Young Kuk, Center for Quantum Nanoscience, Seoul, Korea
Prof. Donghun Lee, Korea University, Seoul, Korea
Dr. Yonuk Chong, Korea Research Institute of Science and Standards, Daejeon, Korea
 
 

Sessions:

Session 1: What is Quantum Nanoscience?


Quantum nanoscience is the intersection of quantum science and nanoscience. In this session, we will describe a working definition as well as interesting concepts and examples of quantum systems at the nanoscale that enable quantum-coherent functionality.

Prof. Andreas Heinrich, Director of IBS Center for Quantum Nanoscience, Seoul, South Korea
“A working definition of quantum nanoscience based on the results of a workshop held in Seoul in September 2017.”

Prof. William D. Oliver, MIT Department of Physics and Director at MIT Lincoln Laboratory, Boston, USA
“State-of-the-art in quantum computing with superconducting devices”

Prof. Andrew Dzurak, School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications, UNSW, Australia
“Current status and future developments in Si quantum computing”

Yonuk Chong, University of Science and Technology(UST), South Korea

Session 2: Quantum Sensing with Nanoscale Systems


Quantum systems can make incredibly sensitive sensors of their environment. At the nanoscale this can be combined with high spatial resolution.

Prof. Ania Jayich, Department of Physics, UCSB, USA
“Putting a quantum sensors in the tip of an atomic force microscope”

Prof. Jörg Wrachtrup, Physics Department of University of Stuttgart, Germany
“Using point defects in materials as quantum sensors”

Prof. Donghun Lee, Physics Department of Korea University, Seoul, South Korea
“Sensing mechanical deformations with a quantum sensor”

Session 3: Theory Challenges in Quantum Nanoscience


Quantum Nanoscience has diverse needs for theoretical investigations ranging from modelling with high precision to the investigation and understanding of quantum coherence.

Prof. Daniel Loss, Department of Physics, University of Basel, Switzerland
“Theoretical concepts and interesting examples of quantum system on the nanoscale”

Prof. Jelena Klinovaja, Department of Physics, University of Basel, Switzerland
“Theoretical concepts and interesting examples of quantum system on the nanoscale”

Martin Plenio - Institute of Theoretical Physics in University of Ulm, Germany

Session 4: Quantum Surface Science at the Nanoscale


Surfaces of materials offer the opportunity to use scanning probe techniques to measure their properties. This can be combined with atomic-scale manipulation to build structures with atomic-scale precision. Recently it has become possible to perform quantum-coherent manipulation of atoms on surfaces.

Prof. Taeyoung Choi, Center for Quantum Nanoscience and Department of Physics at Ewha, Seoul, South Korea
“Quantum sensors on well-defined surfaces: an Scanning Tunneling Microscope perspective”

Prof. Fabio Donati, Center for Quantum Nanoscience and Department of Physics at Ewha, Seoul, South Korea
“Combining scanning tunneling and x-ray absorption spectroscopies for quantum spins on surfaces”

Session 5: A Chemical Route to Quantum Nanoscience


We will explore possible pathways from quantum coherent effects in interesting molecules to the future dream of self-assembled quantum computers.

Prof. Roberta Sessoli, Department of Chemistry, University of Florence, Italy
“Quantum-coherence in molecular magnets”

Dr. Yujeong Bae and Dr. Taner Esat, Center for Quantum Nanoscience and Department of Physics at Ewha, Seoul, South Korea
“Quantum nanoscience with molecules in an STM”

Prof. Wolfgang Wernsdorfer, Department of Physics, KIT Karlsruhe, Germany
“Performing quantum algorithms in molecular magnets”

Prof. Arzhang Ardavan, Department of Physics, Oxford University, United Kingdom
“Can we make 3 dimensional self-assembly of quantum devices?”
 
 

Invited Speakers:

Andreas Heinrich Director of IBS Center for Quantum Nanoscience, Korea
Andrew Dzurak School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications, UNSW, Australia
Ania Jayich Department of Physics, UCSB, USA
Arzhang Ardavan Department of Physics, Oxford Univ., UK
Daniel Loss Department of Physics, Univ. of Basel, Switzerland
Donghun Lee Physics Department of Korea Univ., Korea
Fabio Donati Center for QNS / Department of Physics at Ewha Univ. Korea
Harald Bruno Institute of Physics at Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Swizerland
Jelena Klinovaja Department of Physics, Univ. of Basel, Switzerland
Jörg Wrachtrup Physics Department of University of Stuttgart, Germany
Martin Plenio Institute of Theoretical Physics in University of Ulm, Germany
Roberta Sessoli Department of Chemistry, Univ. of Florence, Italy
Taeyoung Choi Center for QNS / Department of Physics at Ewha Univ., Korea
William D. Oliver Department of Physics, Director at MIT Lincoln Lab, USA
Wolfgang Wernsdorfer Department of Physics, KIT Karlsruhe, Germany
Yonuk Chong University of Science and Technology(UST), Korea

 
 
 

Location

This is a very central location in Korea, only about 1 hour from the international airport in Incheon. Incheon airport has excellent connection to almost all parts of the world.
Ewha Womans University has a beautiful campus that is centrally located in the capital city of South Korea. It offers interesting architecture, green spaces and great facilities to hold a conference.
The weather at the end of September is usually very nice with temperatures in the mid 20s, plenty of sunshine and relatively low humidity.
On Google Maps:

Address:

Lee SamBong Hall
Ewha Campus Complex (ECC)
Ewha Womans' University
52 Ewhayeodae-gil
Daehyeon-dong
Seodaemun-gu
04344 Seoul, Republic of Korea

Coordinates for your navigator:

37.561176, 126.946389

Ewha Campus Map:

Visit this page to see the Ewha Campus Map.

 
 

Our contacts:

Please contact Jihee Min for assistance:

conference@qns.science